<div dir="ltr"><br><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Sat, Oct 7, 2017 at 9:32 AM, Sean P. DeNigris <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:sean@clipperadams.com" target="_blank">sean@clipperadams.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex">Ben Coman wrote<br>
<span class="gmail-">> Unfortunately due to IT lock down I cannot use Pharo at work,<br>
<br>
</span>Not even off a jump drive?</blockquote><div><br></div><div>Nope.  You prompted me to try once again ==> This program is blocked by group policy. For more information, contact your system administrator. </div><div><br></div><div>Even renaming pharo.exe to notepad.exe doesn't work.</div><div>It seems they are using signature based white-listing[1].  </div><div>From an Ops security perspective I applaud such policy.  First place I've seen it used.  Its the only real protection.  Much better than a virus scanner which only maybePossibly notices based on heuristics observing behaviour after the malware is already running.  </div><div>From a practical/user perspective, uurgh,aarggh!</div><div><br></div><div>[1] <a href="https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/tutorials/create-an-application-whitelist-policy-in-windows/">https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/tutorials/create-an-application-whitelist-policy-in-windows/</a></div><div><br></div><div>cheers -ben</div></div></div></div>